Monday July 23, 2018
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28
May
2015
Historic #DeafInPrison Chat

We hosted the first-ever #DeafInPrison Twitter chat to engage in an honest dialogue about the justice system’s failure to provide equal access to justice for deaf people & people with disabilities. The chat raised consciousness about the Deaf Access to Justice Movement and highlighted the need for immediate action to reverse the trends of police brutality against people who are deaf and people with disabilities; deaf wrongful arrests and convictions; & abuse of prisoners who are deaf and prisoners with disabilities.

Visit our Storify story for a recap of the amazing chat. 

Relatedly, the "Deaf In Prison" documentary is now available online. If you have not yet seen the documentary, please visit bit.ly/DeafPrisoners, then share your thoughts on social media using #DeafInPrison.

Sincere thanks to Jeremy Young, Sweta Vohra, and their team's work in creating the documentary.

 
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27
May
2015
Interview with Feminist Magazine Receives Thousands of Views

Readership of popular feminist magazine, Bitch, takes on the issue of disability and deafness in prison in its piece, "What is Life Like for Deaf People in Prison?"  Interview with HEARD's founder, Talila A. Lewis yields powerful quotes:

"It is not uncommon for deaf prisoners not to have have access to programs, communication, or medical and mental health services. This results in deaf people spending more time in prison and having higher recidivism rates, simply because prisons are failing to provide equal access."

"people with disabilities are the most susceptible to unjust encounters within our justice system and represent the largest minority group within our prisons."

 
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27
Apr
2015
Think Progress Quotes HEARD in Deaf Access to Justice Article

Think Progress quotes HEARD in its article on police brutality against the deaf and terrible conditions of confinement for deaf incarcerated people:

"HEARD’s fact sheet indicates that many deaf prisoners are placed in solitary confinement as a substitute for the provision of finding accommodations for them. But sometimes even sign language is banned because corrections professionals “incorrectly view sign language as a formof gang signs.” The group indicates that only seven prisons across the nation have videophones, leaving deaf prisoners in thousands of other prisons without a reliable way to communicate or with TTY devices that prove inadequate or ineffective for deaf prisoners who need to convey complex information with complicated or specialized vocabulary."

 
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HEARD has worked for nearly eight years to locate deaf and deaf-blind men and women housed in prisons across the United States. In which DOC do you think we have found the most deaf and hard of hearing individuals?







 
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